Homemade Utah Scones

Can you keep a secret? Cuz I have a secret that the rest of the world is missing out on…

I have a secret the rest of the world is missing out on. It's a secret recipe for scones. Utah scones. A plate-size, golden-fried, puffy piece of greatness served up with honey butter, syrup, or powdered sugar. Bakerette.com

It’s a secret recipe for “scones”. A plate-size, golden-fried, puffy piece of greatness served up with honey butter, syrup, or powdered sugar.

Mom made these “scones” my whole growing up years. We could count on “scones” for breakfast, especially for special occasions.

I know, I know, these don’t look like your “typical” scone. At least, not the way the rest of the world knows scones, like these Cranberry Chocolate Scones. I had no idea that the world saw scones differently and that the scones I know and love are actually Utah Scones or Mormon Scones. Don’t worry… if you eat them, you won’t grow horns on your head. LOL. It’s funny the perceptions people have about Mormons. I’ll end the rumors now: Mormons do not have horns.

If you ask the nearly 3 million Utahns, they would tell you these golden puffs of goodness are “Scones”. And they would look at you like you were crazy if you showed them the British-style and said those were scones. I’m kidding, of course. But it’s pretty darn close to the truth.

Utah scones are more like Navajo fry bread or Sopapillas where you use a sweet yeast dough, cut up into squares or balls of dough…

I have a secret the rest of the world is missing out on. It's a secret recipe for scones. Utah scones. A plate-sized, golden-fried, puffy piece of greatness served up with honey butter, syrup, or powdered sugar. Bakerette.com

deep fried in hot oil (between 350-375 degrees F)….

I have a secret the rest of the world is missing out on. It's a secret recipe for scones. Utah scones. A plate-sized, golden-fried, puffy piece of greatness served up with honey butter, syrup, or powdered sugar. Bakerette.com

and smothered in honey butter, syrup, or powdered sugar.

I have a secret the rest of the world is missing out on. It's a secret recipe for scones. Utah scones. A plate-sized, golden-fried, puffy piece of greatness served up with honey butter, syrup, or powdered sugar. Bakerette.com

There are a couple of ways I make these scones depending on the time I have…Most of the time I make the homemade dough; other times I use pre-made bread dough, like Rhodes Rolls, and make them that way. I know…so lazy. The homemade dough is thee best version!

They’re so divine! And versatile! Cause not only do we Utahns eat them for breakfast or as a treat, but we also use them for Navajo Tacos where the “scone” is the base of the taco and is topped with refried beans, taco meat, lettuce, tomatoes, olives, cheese, salsa, and sour cream.

And there you have Utah Scones.

Shhhhh. Remember. It’s a secret. Don’t tell. :)

Homemade Utah Scones
 
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Recipe type: Bread
Cuisine: Breakfast, Dessert
Serves: 12 scones
Ingredients
  • 1 cup water, hot
  • 1 tablespoon active dry yeast
  • 1/3 cup oil or melted shortening
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 3 1/2 cups flour, sifted
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 2 quarts frying oil (i.e., safflower or canola oil)
Instructions
  1. Mix 3 tablespoons of warm water with yeast adding a pinch of sugar. Set aside for 10 minutes for yeast to activate and foam.
  2. In the meantime, combine hot water, oil (or melted shortening), salt, and sugar in a large bowl.
  3. Once the yeast has activated, add egg to the yeast mixture. Mix well.
  4. Add the egg/yeast mixture to the oil/sugar mixture. Stir well.
  5. Gradually add flour stirring well after each addition. Knead the dough as it stiffens until you get a doughy, elastic consistency. About 5 minutes.
Make Ahead Method:
  1. Place dough in a well-greased bowl, turning once to grease the top. Cover with plastic wrap and a towel and place in the refrigerator overnight.
  2. Remove from fridge and knead lightly.
  3. Because the dough is still cold, cover with a towel or oil-sprayed plastic wrap and let rise until double (about 1-2 hours). Note: I like to let my dough rise in a warmed oven. I set the temperature to 200 degrees Fahrenheit and warm for approximately 3-5 minutes. Turn oven off. Place dough in oven to rise until double.
Day-of Method:
  1. Place dough in a well-greased bowl, turning once to grease the top. Let dough rise for about 30 minutes or until double in size.
To Fry
  1. Line a plate with paper towels and set aside.
  2. Fill a large sauce pan with 2 inches of oil and heat to 350-375 degrees Fahrenheit over medium-high heat. Once temperature is reached, reduce heat slightly.
  3. Meanwhile, punch down dough and divide into 12 balls. Roll out a piece of dough on a lightly floured surface into 1/4-inch thick circles or squares. You can use your fingers to stretch out the balls of dough. We like ours thick!
  4. Carefully place two or three balls of dough in the oil and fry until golden brown on each side (about 1-2 mins). Transfer to paper towels to drain. Repeat until the dough is all fried.
  5. Serve hot with honey butter, butter, syrup, or powdered sugar.

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About Jennifer Scott

Jen is author, owner, and creative mind behind Bakerette.com. She loves anything chocolate and cheese!

Comments

  1. Our family called theses dough gods, grew up on the Ontario, Canada/Minnesota and had these regularity. Also called elephant ears.

  2. Thank you so much for posting this! I grew up in Utah, but moved my family moved after I graduated from high-school. The very few times I’ve had a chance to go back home the first trip I make is to my favorite childhood memory restaurant for hot scones. :) Going to have to make these first chance I get!

  3. Dale Sugden says:

    Hi there! Any chance you have come across a recipe for the Dunford chocolate donuts? There’s a piece of Utah eating habit.

  4. Are these like the scones served at Jakers?

  5. Thank you for this recipe! I am making these again. Tonight will be the 3rd time making them. My family loves them so much!

  6. Thank you soooo much for posting this. I have been searching for this recipe. I had a friends who’s mom made them for us when I was young. I have been wanting to make these for me and my kiddos. And I have had them both ways as a dessert and as the tacos. Sooooo excited.

  7. Charlene Peters says:

    Here on Prince Edward Island,Canada,where I live, these are called raised dough pancakes. When making bread we save some of the dough and pan fry pieces and serve them as a meal. Good with real maple syrup.

  8. You’re soooo right! These nummy scones are such a Utah thing, and Utahns really know how to make ‘em good! Can’t wait to try your secret family recipe. Whoo!

  9. Sorry – I’ve lived in the northeast and Midwest and scones are not raised dough that is fried. They are baked and like a heavy cake.

  10. Johnny Chopstix says:

    No … horns? but … but … :(

  11. Ironkitten says:

    This is Indian frybread.

  12. Pinning this one too :)

  13. These are one of my kids favorite things! And I used to make them for my seminary kids all the time. In fact, sometimes I still get FB comments about seminary and scones. LOVE these!! Deb @ madefrompinterest.net

    • What great memories for your seminary students!! Sounds like you not only fed their spirit, but their stomachs as well. I bet you were a fantastic teacher!

  14. Now if you will just come to my house and make them we can watch conference!

    • Does that mean I’m invited back to visit? Yahoo!! If that’s the price I pay to get to see my BFF again…I accept!

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