Stabilized Homemade Whipped Cream

All family’s have some kind of dirty little secret lurking in their closets. I mean, my family has lots of them! How do you think we put “fun” in dysfunctional? So I thought I would share with you one dirty little secret in my family and that’s how to thicken and make whipping cream last days.

I hate the fact that when you make whipping cream you have to eat it within hours otherwise it turns flat and watery and goes to waste.  And so unfortunately I have to take it upon myself to continue stuffing my face with everything I can put whip cream on so it won’t go to waste and I end up gaining 10 pounds as the result of it. I really do hate wasting food!

So imagine how excited I was when I discovered this dirty little secret to alleviate me from gaining 10 pounds during the holidays!

Before I just yell out my secret, let me indulge you in a history lesson of how I came to learn about this secret: One day, my great aunt Eloise was in town and I saw her put this strange thick white glob in the cream she was whipping. “What was that you just put in the whipping cream?” I asked inquisitively. She answered matter of factly “cream cheese.” Now why would she put cream cheese in whipping cream? Maybe she just loves cheese like I do and can’t make anything without cheese. But still, I had to ask…

Why do you put cream cheese in whipping cream? She informed me that the cream cheese thickens up the whipping cream AND sets it so it will last for days. Can I just tell you how excited I was? It was like Ben Franklin discovering electricity! So I went home and tried it and guess what? It works and I’ve been using cream cheese in my whipping cream some 20 years later.

She got this dirty little secret from her mom. I went on the Internet to see if anyone else uses cream cheese in their whipping cream. After scrolling through pages and pages of articles, I couldn’t find one site that did. Huh. Now you are privy to our family’s dirty little secret.

Ingredients

  • Heavy whipping cream, any size NOTE: the amount of butterfat contained in whipping cream determines how well the cream will whip and how stable it will be. Heavy whipping cream also doubles in volume when whipped. So you get more bang for your buck! Use 1 cup of cream to make 2 cups of whipped cream.
  • 1-2 tablespoons superfine sugar or other sugar substitute per 1 cup of cream
  • 1 heaping teaspoon cream cheese per 1 cup of cream

Instructions

  1. Whipping cream works much better if you chill your bowl and beaters in the fridge for approximately 15 minutes before whipping. Remove from fridge.
  2. Pour the cream in a large enough bowl that the cream won’t splatter while whipping and which accommodates double the cream after it is whipped as it will double in size.
  3. With an electric mixer, beat cream for 20-30 seconds on low until bubbles begin to form.
  4. Increase mixer speed to medium and beat until the cream begins to thicken and form a soft peak.  Add the sugar a little at a time until your heart’s content.
  5. Now here’s the secret: Increase the mixer speed to high and slowly add 1 heaping teaspoon cream cheese per 1 cup cream. Beat until the cream begins to thicken and forms a stiff peak. NOTE: Be sure to move the beaters along the sides and bottom of the bowl while whipping the cream.
  6. For a soft peak, beat until a soft peak forms when pulling the beaters straight up out of the mixture.
  7.  For a stiff peak, continue beating at high speed. You will know when the cream is is done when you pull out the beaters and it sticks to the beaters.

Note

Whipped cream is generally sweetened with sugar. The whipped cream can be sweetened with granulated sugar, superfine sugar or powdered sugar. Superfine and powdered sugar dissolve quicker and won’t be as gritty. Powdered sugar stabilizes the whipped cream because it  contains cornstarch. Keep in mind that whipping cream doubles in size, so you will want to use a large enough bowl to accommodate the amount of cream you use. (Use 1 cup of cream to make 2 cups of whipped cream).

Storing Leftover Whipped Cream

Store in an airtight container in the coldest part of the fridge.

Whipped cream can also be frozen. Line a cookie sheet with parchment paper and then drop serving size mounds on the parchment and place in the freezer uncovered. When frozen, remove from the parchment, put in a Ziploc bag, and place in the freezer. Remove as needed. It can be stored in the freezer for up to 2 weeks. Great for those nights you want hot chocolate (try Nutella Hot Chocolate!)

5.0 from 5 reviews
How to Make Whipping Cream Last Days Instead of Hours
 
Prep time
Total time
 
Author:
Recipe type: Condiments, Desserts
Ingredients
  • Heavy whipping cream, any size NOTE: the amount of butterfat contained in whipping cream determines how well the cream will whip and how stable it will be. Heavy whipping cream also doubles in volume when whipped. So you get more bang for your buck! Use 1 cup of cream to make 2 cups of whipped cream.
  • 1-2 tablespoons superfine sugar or other sugar substitute per 1 cup of cream
  • 1 heaping teaspoon cream cheese per 1 cup of cream
Instructions
  1. Whipping cream works much better if you chill your bowl and beaters in the fridge for approximately 15 minutes before whipping. Remove from fridge.
  2. Pour the cream in a large enough bowl that the cream won't splatter while whipping and which accommodates double the cream after it is whipped as it will double in size.
  3. With an electric mixer, beat cream for 20-30 seconds on low until bubbles begin to form.
  4. Increase mixer speed to medium and beat until the cream begins to thicken and forms a soft peak. Add the sugar a little at a time.
  5. Now here's the secret: Increase the mixer speed to high and slowly add 1 heaping teaspoon cream cheese per 1 cup cream. Beat until the cream begins to thicken and forms a softpeak. NOTE: Be sure to move the beaters along the sides and bottom of the bowl while whipping the cream.
  6. For a soft peak, beat until a soft peak forms when pulling the beaters straight up out of the mixture.
  7. For a stiff peak, continue beating at high speed. You will know when the cream is is done when you pull out the beaters and it sticks to the beaters.
Notes
1. Whipped cream is generally sweetened with sugar. The whipped cream can be sweetened with granulated sugar, superfine sugar or powdered sugar. Superfine and powdered sugar dissolve quicker and won't be as gritty. Powdered sugar stabilizes the whipped cream because it  contains cornstarch. Keep in mind that whipping cream doubles in size, so you will want to use a large enough bowl to accommodate the amount of cream you use. (Use 1 cup of cream to make 2 cups of whipped cream).
Storing Leftover Whipped Cream
Store in an airtight container in the coldest part of the fridge.
Whipped cream can also be frozen. Line a cookie sheet with parchment paper and then drop serving size mounds on the parchment and place in the freezer uncovered. When frozen, remove from the parchment, put in a Ziploc bag, and place in the freezer. Remove as needed. It can be stored in the freezer for up to 2 weeks. Great for those nights you want hot chocolate (try Nutella Hot Chocolate!)

About Jen

Jen is author, owner, and creative mind behind Bakerette.com. She loves anything chocolate and cheese!

Comments

  1. Omg, you’re a family of geniuses! Of course I’m going to make mine this way from now on, but I LOVE the idea of freezing single servings! My husband likes a little ice cream with cool whip at night, but his serving sizes get a little out of control (like a ten year old’s)
    Thank you for sharing your genius

  2. Not sure if you’re still checking comments for this post, but I have a question. Do you think this would work in place of cool whip in a frozen dessert?
    Thanks!

    • Hi Jen. Good question. I haven’t tried it in a frozen dessert, but if you use heavy cream, I don’t see why you couldn’t use it in place of Cool Whip. If you do try it, I’d love to hear how it went.

      • So I finally got around to trying it in a frozen dessert…and it worked beautifully! I have no idea if it would work in every frozen dessert, but I tried it in a Frozen German Sweet Chocolate pie and everyone loved it. Yay! (I am allergic to chocolate, so I wasn’t able to try it, but the texture looked great and it stayed nice and high/fluffy–and my guests adored it!). I will try it in some other things as I get a chance and I’ll let you know about those, too. FYI, because the recipe I used calls for the cool whip (I replaced with the stabilized whipped cream) to be folded into other ingredients, I doubled the cream cheese in hopes of giving the stabilized whipped cream some extra stability. I also added extra sweetener and a little more vanilla, since in my memory cool whip is pretty sweet. I did try the whipped cream before I added it to the chocolate mixture and it was yummy–no cream cheese taste at all.
        Thanks again for a great recipe!!

        • I’m so happy to hear this Jen. Glad you enjoyed it and that it worked out so well for you. I’m sure the readers like to hear how the recipe works too. I appreciate the good feedback. Have a great weekend.

  3. marianne says:

    if i premade this and stored it in a jar to bring to school because i wanted to decorate a pie at school during lunch, will it work how long will it last in a jar at room temperature? when chilled?

    • Hi Marianne. I’m not sure how long it would last outside the fridge as dairy should be refrigerated. Perhaps you can use a cooler or the school’s fridge to store it in.

    • Marianne, I would not leave it at room temp very long and then try to use it as I think it may get a bit runny. When refrigerated, however, it has been my experience that it will last at least a couple of days. Do you have a fridge at school? I don’t know if you are a staff member or student, but maybe the cafeteria or the nurse’s office has a fridge you could use. Otherwise, maybe bring it in a small cooler?

  4. marianne says:

    hello i was thinkivg of using this for filling for crepes if i made it ahead of time and left it in room temperature for a few hours then proceed to use it and pipe some into made crepes. will this whipped cream recipe last?

  5. That sounds awesome! Can’t wait to try it. Can I use cream cheese spread?

  6. I will try this trick tomorrow! I’ve been looking through pages of ”tricks” to stabilize whipped cream because I have a cake to ice, but this one seems to be the easiest and practical (I really don’t want to get gelatin)! I can’t wait to see the result, really hope it works

  7. I have always stabilized whipped cream using dissolved and thickened unflavored gelatin, but your method is so much easier! I cannot wait to try it!

  8. Sherri @madefrompinterest.net says:

    I featured your idea of adding cream cheese today. It is genius Jeni. I love everything you do.

  9. Oh man that couldn’t be bad!

  10. OMG! I came across your whipping cream recipe on Facebook, which led me to this page and your blog. I love to bake and just try new things. Needless to say, I think your blog will keep me happy in my kitchen through the holidays and beyond! TY!

    • Erin, you just made my day!! Thank you for your compliments. I so appreciate it. Enjoy the recipes! I hope you come back often. Have a great Thanksgiving.

  11. This is a great idea. My mother always put a teaspoon of powdered milk in hers to stabilize it but I like the cream cheese idea better.

    • Hi Maureen. I’ve heard of the powdered milk concept and using powdered sugar to help set it, but it doesn’t quite set it like the cream cheese. If you try it, let me know how you like it.

  12. this sounds like a great idea..does it make the cream taste a bit tart?

    • Hey “Annie” :) It doesn’t taste tart at all. It’s really delicious. Since we learned this “trick” we’ve never gone back. We made some whip cream last Friday for a pie and it’s still in the fridge and delicious. We made hot chocolate last night and added some. Yum.

  13. So glad this got a great review!

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